Cavanaugh Shares WAC Latest

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Sean Cavanaugh of the Warren Achievement Center dropped by to share the latest with his organization. He highlighted the latest Achiever of the Month award winner in Monmouth, which was Leo Ramer, the head of music at Immaculate Conception Church since 1974.

“Leo was a very humble recepient. People always say they don’t deserve it, but they do. They don’t like to be singled out and say ‘hey, you’re doing a great job,’ but if they are, then they need to be recognized,” Cavanaugh stated.

Cavanaugh also mentioned a recent grant contribution from a local business that will help the organization provide more opportunities for their achievers. He reiterated the importance of having new activities for the achievers to take part in.

“Grants like the one we just received will be very, very helpful with that in bringing new experiences. We will be bringing new speakers in, and it’s just wonderful. We’re very glad for that,” he said.

The last thing Cavanaugh touched on during his time at the station was the need for new employees at the Warren Achievement Center. He encourages anyone that is interested to go online or stop in to fill out an application.
written by Jackson Kane

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